Can you have a normal pregnancy with a septate uterus?

Not all women with a septate uterus experience a miscarriage, but some women will go into premature labor. It is possible for you to have a healthy pregnancy even with a septate uterus.

Does a uterine septum cause pain?

What are the symptoms of septate uterus? Often a septate uterus doesn’t cause any symptoms until puberty when it may cause menstrual pain that is greater than normal. In some cases, it might cause complications during pregnancy and/or delivery including preterm labor, miscarriage and breech (feet first) delivery.

Does a septate uterus affect periods?

A septate (or partial septate) uterus can result in more endometrial lining (or surface area) of the uterus so this can mean heavier bleeding. However, it does depend on the size of the partial septum. For many women with a partial septum, there is no interference with menstruation and fertility.

Can a uterine septum cause heavy periods?

How long is recovery from uterine septum surgery?

Recovery from Septum Surgery Depending on the type of surgery, you should be able to return to work within a day or two following surgery and can expect a full recovery after about 2-4 weeks. You may experience some abdominal pain after uterine surgery, and vaginal pain after vaginal surgery.

Can a uterine septum cause infertility?

Does a uterine septum cause infertility? A septate uterus doesn’t normally cause problems with conception, but it does interfere with your ability to carry your baby full term. In fact, up to 40% of women with septate uteri have miscarriages.

Is vaginal septum surgery painful?

You may experience some abdominal pain after uterine surgery, and vaginal pain after vaginal surgery. Some women find that it is difficult to sit down comfortably for a few days after surgery. This is normal, but call your doctor if the pain worsens.

Should I get my uterine septum removed?

Women with a septate uterus may be at increased risk of subfertility, pregnancy loss, preterm birth and foetal malpresentation. Based on low quality evidence, current guidelines recommend removal of the intrauterine septum or, more cautiously, state that the procedure should be evaluated in future studies.