What is the Sellick maneuver used for?

The Sellick Maneuver is performed by applying gentle pressure to the anterior neck (in a posterior direction) at the level of the Cricoid Cartilage. The Maneuver is most often used to help align the airway structures during endotracheal intubation.

What is another term for the Sellick manoeuvre?

Cricoid pressure, also known as the Sellick manoeuvre or Sellick maneuver, is a technique used in endotracheal intubation to try to reduce the risk of regurgitation.

How does the Sellick or BURP maneuver help when intubating?

It is similar to the BURP (backwards upwards rightwards pressure) technique, but serves a completely different purpose. Though Sellick can lower aspiration risk by preventing regurgitation, BURP improves the ability to see the glottis during intubation.

When should cricoid pressure be used?

Cricoid pressure to occlude the upper end of the oesophagus, also called the Sellick manoeuvre, may be used to decrease the risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents during intubation for rapid induction of anaesthesia. Effective and safe use of the technique requires training and experience.

Why do we apply cricoid pressure?

Cricoid pressure is a technique where pressure is placed on an area of bone-like tissue in the neck to flatten the oesophagus (tube that connects the mouth to the stomach). This is intended to prevent vomiting up of the stomach contents. The application of cricoid pressure for this purpose is very common.

What is BURP in intubation?

As we know, backward, upward, rightward pressure (BURP) maneuver is a useful skill to facilitate glottis visualization for tracheal intubation.

Why is cricoid pressure used during intubation?

Cricoid pressure is a technique that has become part of rapid sequence intubation to prevent aspiration of gastric contents.

What is the importance of cricoid pressure?

Applying cricoid pressure helps to prevent the passive regurgitation and aspiration of gastric contents during bag-mask ventilation and attempted tracheal intubation (Nolan et al, 2005).

Why do we need cricoid pressure?

When should cricoid pressure be used in ACLS?

The routine use of cricoid pressure during intubation is no longer recommended. To maximize the chance of good resuscitation outcomes, epinephrine should be administered as early as possible, ideally within 5 minutes of the start of cardiac arrest from a nonshockable rhythm (asystole and pulseless electrical activity).

What does the cricoid do?

The cricoid cartilage serves to maintain airway patency, forms part of the larynx, and provides an attachment point for key muscles, ligaments, and cartilage, which function in the opening and closing the vocal cords for sound production.

What are two types of laryngoscope blades?

The two most commonly available types of laryngoscope blades are the straight (Miller) and the curved (Macintosh, Mac).

What is a Sellick maneuver?

Sellick Maneuver. The Sellick Maneuver is performed by applying gentle pressure to the anterior neck (in a posterior direction) at the level of the Cricoid Cartilage. The Maneuver is most often used to help align the airway structures during endotracheal intubation.

Can Sellick’s Maneuver prevent gastric insufflation during RSII?

The findings of Rice et al. lend strong support to the efficacy of Sellick’s maneuver in occluding the alimentary tract posterior to the cricoid cartilage. There is strong evidence that gastric insufflation can be prevented by CP, and that mask ventilation can be applied safely during RSII.

Does alignment of cricoid cartilage and esophagus influence the effectiveness of Sellick maneuver?

Alignment of cricoid cartilage and esophagus and its potential influence on the effectiveness of Sellick maneuver in children. [Pediatr Emerg Care. 2010]

What is the maneuver used for?

The Maneuver is most often used to help align the airway structures during endotracheal intubation. The real value of this procedure is often misunderstood and therefore, is often underutilized.